Email: Training@cp-journal.com

Call: (646) 470-7885

October 31, 2011

Why We Observe In Clusters

When it comes to observing body language and biometric cues, we want to stress the absolute imperative that we have as observers to put behavioral indicators together into clusters.  Because gestures have different meaning in different contexts, we have to be cautious in the conclusions that we come to.  One body language indicator alone does not tell us anything, but if you can identify a cluster of 3 kinesic or biometric cues all leading you to that same conclusion, you can increase the likelihood of your success.  In his book What Every Body Is Saying, Joe Navarro talks about “the more pieces of the puzzle you posses, the better your chances of putting them all together and seeing the picture they portray” (pg 13).

October 30, 2011

Why We Do Video Training – Short-Circuiting Years Of Experience

If you ask most veteran Law Enforcement Officers how long it takes to become a strong counter-narcotics or gang officer, you will find answers usually falling within a five to twelve year range, and usually more specifically around ten years.  That is a significant amount of time required to train and develop to become and effective operator.  The same concept applies to the military as well.  Our Staff Non-Commissioned Officers (SNCOs) who have a wealth of experience that they have earned over the last decade of non-stop deployments are easily comparable to those veteran cops.

October 28, 2011

Video 3 – Convenience Store Robbery

Watch the video and determine at what point you KNOW something is going to happen.    The comments section will have my breakdown of the video, but add in your observations as you may see something different.

Watch the video multiple times.  The goal of the video is to build your file folders for threat behavior, increasing your ability to identify these behaviors in real-time.

Establishment of these File Folders is what will allow you to become effective at Predicting threats before they occur.

October 27, 2011

The Warrior Ethos by Stephen Pressfield – Book Review

If you read The Warrior Ethos by Steven Pressfield and are not inspired, this book was not written for you in the first place.  This well written explanation of the mentality behind history’s greatest fighting cultures teaches about the warrior lifestyle and also urges the reader to embrace it.  However, for those out there that have answered the call and chosen a life of sacrifice in pursuit of a higher purpose, every page, every chapter, and every story offers motivation and understanding.

Josh Arnett

October 26, 2011

Biometric Cues

Biometrics cues are uncontrollable bodily reactions to some type of external stimulus. These uncontrollable reactions are caused by the limbic system. When the limbic system perceives something as a threat it sends out a rush of hormones and chemicals that will have an affect on our body. As we get older we start to recognize some of these effects and associate them to emotions. If someone is mad you would expect to see flared nostrils and reddening of the face because that individual is preparing for the freeze, flight or fight response.  The more an individual has to hide their true emotions, the more that individual will stand out. Theses are just a few indicators you would see amongst others that would be very easy to see as well. To the trained observer you can pick up on not only body language but biometric cues as well.

October 25, 2011

Team Rubicon Needs Your Help

Former Marines Jake Wood and William McNulty founded Team Rubicon in January 2010 in response to the earthquake in Haiti.  While victims of the quake waited for large relief organizations like the Red Cross to mobilize and make their way in to the disaster area, Team Rubicon (TR) got in within days and immediately started providing medical care to those most in need.  They are comprised of mainly military veterans and medical professionals, and have taken the best those worlds have to offer to create an organization capable of rapid response and commitment to their cause.

In response to the 7.2 magnitude earthquake in Eastern Turkey, TR has deployed a team to begin providing relief and preparing for potential follow on support.  If you would like to learn more about this group or donate in support of their mission in Turkey, visit:

http://teamrubiconusa.org/

Rick Gonzalez

October 23, 2011

Brain Rules by Dr. John Medina – Book Review

As we discuss the concepts of what it takes to understand behavioral analysis, oftentimes we have to discuss what happens in our brain as our sensory systems receive information. We also spend a good amount of time describing the most important of the senses to a trained observer which is sight. To aid in our understanding of these complex systems, we spend a good amount of time researching books and articles, which describes these processes. One standout book, which has become a valuable resource for us, is Brain Rules by Dr. John Medina.

October 21, 2011

Predictive Profiling and Tactical Analysis

Predictive Profiling is the guiding concept that has driven the development of the Tactical Analysis course.  The goal is to make Marines, police officers, and security professional capable of predicting the 5 W’s for any attack the enemy can present to us.  Because protectors can be in any country in the world, preparing for this situation can be very challenging.  In fact, it would be impossible to train protectors for every possible scenario with the limited time and resources we have prior to being in the area.

October 20, 2011

Why Understanding Relationships Creates Better Intel

If you want to learn about someone (we will call him the target,) don’t waste your time asking that person anything about himself.  You will never get the whole story.  This person may guard information, not tell whole truths, be biased, or simply give you the run around.  The two people who will give you the best information on your target is your target’s best friend and his worst enemy.

October 13, 2011

When Emotions Don’t Fit the Baseline – What the Face Offers

When we teach our students to read body language during our course, I often encourage students to ignore the face of the person that they are observing.  Why? Because I believe that the face can deceive us more easily than what is shown below the shoulders, and focusing our observation on the body will create a more sound assessment of the meaning of the person’s gestures.  Because of social demands placed on us, we often put conscious effort into controlling our face, which may help a person conceal a true emotion from others not trained to identify the discrepancies.  That is the problem that most concerns me when reading body language, when it is being controlled consciously.

October 10, 2011

Video 2: Robbery at Metro PCS

Watch the video and determine at what point you KNOW something is going to happen.    The comments section will have my breakdown of the video, but add in your observations as you may see something different.

Watch the video multiple times.  The goal of the video is to build your file folders for threat behavior, increasing your ability to identify these behaviors in real-time.

Establishment of these File Folders is what will allow you to become effective at Predicting threats before they occur.

Rick Gonzalez

October 5, 2011

Don’t get punched in the face

If you are trying to find the quickest way to get punched in the face, try staring people down in a busy marketplace.  That is exactly what will happen if you start employing overt observation techniques from a non-concealed observation post.  Sometimes, employing these techniques can get exciting, and you will get so focused, you can become “blind” to counter surveillance.  This is called “Change Blindness”.  We will discuss this concept in another post.  So how do you avoid the badge of shame associated when a Wal-Mart loss prevention specialist appears “out of nowhere” and asks you to leave?  Or worse… when a gang banger decides your face should meet his fist.